Posts tagged ‘Onion’

September 25, 2013

Harissa Cauliflower Mushrooms with Romesco

Harissa Cauliflower Mushrooms

I know it’s been a while since I posted a new blog, but I’ve just been too darn busy enjoying the awesome coverage my Asian Steak Tartare got in the Bitten Word’s Cover to Cover Challenge.

But seriously, I was actually on vacation down in San Diego helping my sister (and occasional dessert recipe contributor) get moved into graduate school. It was a lovely break, but I feel bad for leaving you all hanging without any new dishes to try. So to make it up to you, I have a post adorned with tons of scrumptious looking pictures!

These Harissa Caulifower Mushrooms with Romesco Sauce were part of a big tapas night I did a few weeks back, and they were positively delicious! The union of classic Spanish ingredients with zesty Moroccan flavors is a great flavor combination. The filling is spicy, tangy, and salty while the mushrooms themselves provide a real meaty feel to the dish.

These stuffed mushrooms are great as an appetizer or alongside a few other tapas for dinner. If you wanted to make this dish more substantive, perhaps to serve as an entree, you could add or substitute Spanish chorizo to the stuffing. Either way, it’s going to be delicious!

Tapas Dinner

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August 12, 2013

Chicken Tinga Chilaquiles

Tinga Chilaquiles

When I imagined this dish, I was aiming for nachos.

I had in my head an image of cheesy goodness oozing between tortilla chips with a smattering of deliciously spicy chicken tinga tossed over the top. But I wound up getting the portions wrong, and there was a lot more chicken tinga than I expected. When I pulled it out of the oven and tried to pull a chip away it crumpled soggily under the weight of all the toppings.

So I wound up eating it with a fork instead, and it was truly fantastic. I was going to call them “fork nachos” and shout the name from the rooftops to anyone who would listen, but after a little Google searching I discovered there was already a name for this kind of delicious smothered nachos: “Chilaquiles.”

And man, these are some awesome Chilaquiles.

They’ve got everything you could want in a Mexican dish. The chicken tinga itself spicy, tangy, and just a little bit sweet, while the rest of the toppings are a blend of creamy, cheesy, earthy and herbal. The tortilla chips provide just enough of a base to hold the whole meal together without giving it an overwhelmingly starchy feel.

You won’t be able to resist going back for seconds!

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June 8, 2013

Chorizo and Yam Hash

Chorizo Yam Hash

You know what the best thing about brunch is?

Trick question, everything about brunch is amazing. It’s the perfect combination of flavor, flair, comfort and sociability. Brunch can be light and airy or decadent enough for two meals – which it just so happens to be, so you don’t even need to feel guilty when you eat that chicken fried steak or eggs benedict.

But still, brunch has a fatal flaw: it’s best served lazy.

That’s fine if you want to drag yourself out of bed and stroll over to your favorite brunch spot, but what if you want to indulge in the comfort of your own home? Many brunch dishes are as complicated as they are luxurious, making a lazy mid-morning meal almost impossible.

Fear not, this Chorizo and Yam Hash recipe is the solution to your brunch conundrum. It’s low on ingredients, short on instructions, but packed full of meaty chorizo, sweet and savory yams, and sharp manchego goodness – perfect for a lazy at-home brunch!

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March 3, 2013

Pulled Pork & Pickled Apple Sandwich with Horseradish-Chèvre Aioli

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I started this blog – at least in part – to push myself to come up with new and interesting recipe to share. One of my favorite ways of doing this has been through a culinary challenge: combining unusual ingredients, putting a new spin on an old dish, or some other difficult task.

My last culinary challenge, however, was more than a year ago, and had less to do with creative ingredients and more to do with creative uses of a gas grill.

So when a group of friends offered a new challenge by picking three disparate ingredients for me to make a dish out of, I could barely contain my excitement.

Their selection? Apples, horseradish, and chèvre cheese.

And thus this new pulled pork sandwich was born! The homemade barbecue sauce is a bit more mild than most store-bought versions, which allows the flavors of the meat and other ingredients to shine through. The pickled apples are sour and tart, but still slightly sweet. The aioli is creamy and sharp with just the right amount of horseradish bite. All three components come together to form a creative and tasty new pulled pork recipe!

When I made this my pork wound up closer to stewed than pulled. I was using my awesome new pressure cooker and only cooked it for about 30 minutes, which didn’t quite do the trick. Regardless, I would recommend using a pressure cooker for this recipe (and buying one if you don’t have one) because it cuts the cook time for the pork by several hours.

Have a culinary challenge? Go to the Dear Chef tab and let me know!

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February 11, 2013

Green Pea and Mushroom Risotto with Sun-Dried Tomato and Basil

Risotto

I’m generally of the mind that when it comes to cooking, form follows function. Substance over style. The bite is more important than the bark. You get the idea.

Sometimes, though, it’s fun to cook something that just looks awesome.

This dish gives your the opportunity to do just that. The sticky, adhesive risotto can be made into a variety of shapes using everyday kitchen items. Further, the bold flavors are mirrored by bold colors that make for great presentation options.

This recipe is delicious in its own right – blending together a number of classic Italian flavors – but it’s also a great opportunity to practice your plating skills or impress a special someone with a bit of dramatic flair.

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November 24, 2012

Butternut Squash and Pomegranate Croquettes

Thanksgiving is my favorite holiday, plain and simple. Nothing against all the other holidays, but Thanksgiving has the perfect combination of football, food, and family that just can’t be beat.

And did I mention the food?

I love everything that’s on the Thanksgiving table, from the turkey to the mashed potatoes to the green beans to the cranberries. But every year I can’t help but long for a surprise in the mix. Some dish that comes along and turns the whole dinner on it’s head (in a good way!)

That’s what inspired these croquettes, which combine some classic Thanksgiving flavors with some not-so-traditional ingredients. The inspiration also came from one of my favorite food bloggers, Nick Evans over at Macheesmo, who recently crafted a Kabocha squash risotto topped with pomegranate and sage. It’s a damn good risotto, but I wanted to make something that emphasized the traditional Thanksgiving flavors of squash and sage.

These croquettes definitely hit the mark. The squash, along with the sweet potato that provides enough hold for frying, shine through in every bite of croquette, perfectly seasoned with sage, onion and a hint of parmesan. The pomegranate is a great twist, each a burst of tart, sweet juice.

When I made this I let it chill for 15 minutes the in freezer to really solidify it in preparation for frying it. Although it retained its shape well, the first one I fried was still cool in the center when I pulled it from the pan. Leaving it for only ten minutes in a refrigerator will mean the croquettes aren’t as firm –  making them a bit more finicky – but the end result is definitely worth it.

I think it’s going to be a new Thanksgiving tradition in the Rosemary Renaissance kitchen!

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September 23, 2012

BBQ Pizza with Pineapple & Arugula

While I was ingredient-hunting for this dish I ran head-first into a big old bottle of nostalgia. In Woodinville, where I grew up, there was a small, divey barbecue joint that I used to go to with my family. The lights were perpetually dim and the staff were all surly pranksters. Most importantly though, their barbecue was unparalleled.

The Armadillo barbecue eventually closed shop as Woodinville grew and gentrified. Although they reopened as a catering only operation in another town, I never saw anything from them again. Until, while wandering my local grocery store, I saw a bottle of their barbecue sauce.

Washingtonians – If you see Armadillo Barbecue sauce, purchase it immediately. I suggest a quick nip in the nearest alleyway to tide you over until you get home.

Now onto the pizza at hand. (See what I did there?)

A great barbecue sauce brings everything together, but the full cast of characters really makes this recipe. The pineapple highlights the sugars in the sauce while adding notes of tangy tartness. The red onion brings zest and cut through the underlying sweetness. The arugula, added at the very end so that it cooks just so, adds crunch and notes of spice.

All the toppings rest on a bed of Parmesan and mozzarella that sit atop fresh-made dough. Making your own dough can seem intimidating at first – I certainly was for me – but pizza dough is one of the simplest kinds to make. You wouldn’t expect flour, water and yeast to taste so good, but it really kicks this dish up a notch.

BBQ Pizza with Pineapple & Argula

  • 2 cups flour
  • 1 teaspoon sugar
  • 1 envelope dry yeast
  • 2 teaspoons salt
  • 1 cup lukewarm water
  • 1 1/2 tablespoons olive oil, plus reserve
  • 1/3 cup barbecue sauce
  • 1/2 cup grated parmesan
  • 5 mozzarella balls, sliced
  • 1/2 red onion, sliced into half moons
  • 1/3 cup pineapple, diced
  • 2/3 cup arugula

 

  1. In a large, non-reactive bowl combine the flour, sugar, yeast, salt, water and olive oil. Mix until evenly combined and knead the dough into a smooth, firm ball.
  2. Coat the outside of the ball lightly with olive oil. Cover the bowl with saran wrap and let stand until the dough doubles in size, approximately 1 hour. On a lightly floured surface, roll out the dough to desired thickness (I recommend thin crust). Pre-heat the oven to 425 degrees.
  3. Cover a baking sheet with tin foil and cover lightly with olive oil. Place the dough on top. Spread the barbecue sauce over the dough, followed by the mozzarella and parmesan, red onion and pineapple. Place the pizza in the oven and cook until the cheese is melted and crust is golden brown, approximately 16-20 minutes.
  4. Remove the pizza from the oven and add the arugula on top. Let sit for at least 5 minutes, cut as desired and serve.
June 9, 2012

Mole Pizza

When making this dish I stumbled into a food blogging ethical dilemma: If you make a dish and photograph it one way, but decide it would actually taste better another way, do you post the version that you made or the modified recipe?

As I envisioned – and original cooked – this pizza, it had tequila-candied kumquats on it. Kumquats are slightly sweet, tangy little fruits with edible skins and seeds. They were intended to bring an extra hint of sugar and infuse a hint more Mexican flair. They would being way to sugary and a poor match for the dish. Because they were simply a topping on a pizza, however, I picked them off and had a perfectly delicious meal

After arduously weighing the pros and cons, I decided to leave the candied kumquats out of this post. Maybe I need to take blogging ethics course, but whatever. When it comes to the recipe, it’s better this way.

The mole-tomato sauce is sweet and robust, with mild notes of dark chocolate and chili woven in. The cotija (also known as the greatest cheese to grace the face of this earth) is sharp, salty, and crisps to a delightful golden brown when roasted on the pizza. Finally, the tomatillos provide a tangy and slightly bitter balance to round out the dish. It’s simple – even more simple if you buy a pre-made crust, although I wouldn’t recommend it – but remarkably flavorful and unique.

If you’re looking for pizza that’s out the box (figuratively, not literally) then this is perfect for you!

Mole Pizza

  • 1/2 cup warm water
  • 1/2 packet of yeast
  • 1 1/4 cups flour
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 2 tablespoons sugar
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 1 tablespoon butter
  • 1/2 onion, chopped
  • 1 cup chorizo
  • 1/2 cup mole sauce
  • 1/2 cup tomato sauce
  • 1 1/4 cups cotija
  • 2 tomatillos, diced

 

  1. Combine the warm water and yeast in a small bowl. Allow it to stand until frothy, approximately ten minutes.
  2. Combine the yeasty water with the flour, salt, sugar and olive oil. Knead until firm. Shape into a ball and cover for 30 minutes, or until increased in size by 1/2. Pre-heat the oven to 350 degrees.
  3. While waiting for the dough to rise, heat a pan to medium-high. Add the butter and saute the onions until they just start to become translucent, about 3-4 minutes. Add the chorizo and saute until thoroughly cooked.
  4. Once the dough has risen, use a rolling pin or your hands to flatten it out and set it on an aluminum-covered baking tray or pizza stone. Combine the mole sauce and tomato sauce and coat the dough. Build the pizza from there by adding the cotija, tomatillos and cooked chorizo.
  5. Place the pizza in the oven and bake until the cheese is melted and crusts are golden brown, approximately 20-25 minutes. Let cool, cut and serve.
February 26, 2012

Sun-Dried Tomato, Basil and Chèvre Macaroni and Cheese

We’re drawing close to the end of Winter, and I’m going to take every opportunity possible to make comfort food while it’s still seasonally appropriate.

So a few weeks back I trekked through the snow to meet up with a couple friends and whip up this zesty version of a classic comfort food dish: Mac and Cheese.

Gourmet macaroni and cheese is all the rage these days amongst upscale restaurants. You can’t hardly look at a menu without seeing gruyère-and-lobster, blue-and-fig-and-rosemary, green chili, or countless other variations of the dish. Some people are tired of the trend, but to me it exemplifies one of the greatest techniques in cooking: the ability to separate the flavors from the vehicle – in this case, macaroni – and apply new ones to the dish.

I chose to use a handful of Italian ingredients to liven up the profile of the macaroni and cheese. Although normally somewhat aggressive flavors, the sun-dried tomato, basil and chèvre are all mellowed by each others presence. The tartness of the sun-dried tomato is balanced by the creaminess of the sauce, while the herbal notes of basil cut through the sharp, salty chèvre. The combination creates a distinctive, but deceptively tempered, dish.

This is a hearty meal with Italian flair is perfect for any dark, rainy evening. To serve, I recommend red wine and roaring fire.

Sun-Dried Tomato, Basil and Chèvre Macaroni and Cheese

  • 2 cups macaroni
  • 2 tablespoon butter
  • 1/2 cup onion, finely diced
  • 3 cloves of garlic, finely diced
  • 1/3 cup sun-dried tomato, finely diced
  • 1/2 cup heavy cream
  • 1/2 cup chèvre
  • 1/2 cup mozzarella
  • 1 tablespoon black pepper
  • 1 tablespoon oregano
  • 10 basil leaves, roughly shredded
  • 1/3 cup breadcrumbs
  • 1/3 cup Parmesan cheese, grated

 

  1. Cook the macaroni al dente according to instructions. Pre-heat the oven to 350 degrees.
  2. Heat a large saucepan to medium-high. Add the butter, onion, garlic and sun-dried tomato and saute for 6-8 minutes or until the onions begin to turn translucent.
  3. Reduce the heat to low. Add the heavy cream, chèvre, mozzarella, black pepper and oregano and simmer for another 5 minutes.
  4. Combine the macaroni, shredded basil and chèvre sauce in a large casserole dish and mix together until all the ingredients are evenly distributed. Sprinkle the breadcrumbs and Parmesan cheese over the top and place the casserole dish in the oven for 25-30 minutes.
February 22, 2012

Potato Keftedes

In traditional Greek cuisine Keftedes are made from ground meat, typically either lamb of beef. It’s combined with a couple finely diced vegetables, spiced, rolled into balls, and either seared or roasted as a shish kabob. This recipe takes the concept, along with many of the flavoring components, and applies it to potatoes rather than meat.

The ingredients are startlingly basic, but nonetheless create a robust flavor profile when combined against the relatively mundane backdrop that is the potato. The green onions, much milder than their burlier cousins, add a minor, pleasant kick to the mix. The tomatoes provide bursts of juicy sweetness. Finally, the paprika imparts a light smokiness while the other spices round out the palette. And although there are a variety of different tastes in play, none of them are so strong as to overwhelm the earthy potato base.

To me, the most intriguing element of this recipe is that its vegan. I take to doing the final frying in butter, because I think it tastes just a bit better, but it’s just as easy to sear the pancakes in a little bit of olive oil. I am no great backer of veganism, but a good cook is capable of making a dish for any audience.

Whether or not you’re look for a vegan recipe ace in the hole, I highly recommend keeping this card up your sleeve. When it comes down to it, it’s basically a Greek mashed potato pancake. You really can’t possibly go wrong.

Potato Keftedes

  • 1 large russet potato
  • 1 bundle of spring onions, green and white sections separated, finely chopped
  • 2 medium sized tomatoes, finely diced and patted dry
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 1/4 cup flour
  • 1 tablespoon black pepper
  • 1 tablespoon garlic powder
  • 1 tablespoon paprika
  • 1 tablespoon butter (or olive oil for a vegan recipe)

 

  1. Pre-heat the oven to 350 degrees and bake the potato until cooked through, between 60 and 90 minutes depending on the size.
  2. Remove the potato and allow it to cool before handling. Use a fork to scoop out the contents into a large mixing bowl.
  3. Add all the other ingredients except the butter and combine until evenly mixed. The potato mixture should be cohesive enough to form patties that retain their shape, but not
  4. Add the butter to a pan and heat to medium-high. Fry the potato patties until golden brown, 2-3 minutes on either side. Remove from heat.
  5. To serve, plate the keftedes and sprinkle with the chopped green onion stem.
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